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Higher spec power supply
#1
I'm using a generic 5.25v, 3A microusb power supply with TinkerBoard which seems to be working fine. I understand micro usb spec limit is 5v/1.8A. I'm wondering if the power regulator chip on TinkerBoard will enforce microusb standard, or it will take whatever plugged in, in my case, 5.25v/3A? 

Thanks.
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#2
The 3A is the maximum the power supply can supply
The tinker board will take the current it needs, less than an amp if its not doing much, maybe over an amp if you are running intensive software.

Micros usb connections are very small, so in practice it may be hard to draw three amps over such small connections.

Also micro usb cables, have different thicknesess of wire, if you get a cheap usb cable, dont expect it to pass much over an amp, it will act as a resistor, drop a voltage and get warm
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#3
There's a youtube video showing tinkerboard typically uses < 1A but at peak it can go up to >2.5A for several seconds. I guess microusb interface is ok to supply over spec current in very short time?
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#4
(09-21-2017, 01:24 PM)qaplus Wrote: There's a youtube video showing tinkerboard typically uses < 1A but at peak it can go up to >2.5A for several seconds. I guess microusb interface is ok to supply over spec current in very short time?

While this may be true for the Tinker itself (I've never seen an issue with my Tinker + USB SSD powered by the 3.4A Ikea KOPPLA and a thick 7" microUSB cable) as soon as you add peripherals you can easily have power problems.  Even just a keyboard.  

The bottom line is that microUSB power just doesn't work for modern ARM chips, manufacturers need to stop using it in their devices and people need to refuse to buy them.  

If you want stability on the Tinker, you really need an adjustable 5V supply connected to the GPIO power pins (2 5V wires to 2 5V Tinker pins and 2 ground wires to 2 Tinker ground pins).  Unfortunately, I have yet to see a cheap compact plug-and-play device to do this, but it's not difficult with a few parts from Amazon and a cheap soldering iron.  You'll see a lot of advice and solutions on this forum and the Armbian forums.
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